Rutherford County, TN | Gilliams of Virginia

Gilliams of Rutherford County, Tennessee
Updated March 17, 2016

Rutherford_County TN.svg

Background
Rutherford County was formed in 1803 from parts of Davidson, Williamson and Wilson counties and named in honor of Griffith Rutherford (1721–1805). Rutherford was a North Carolina colonial legislator and a Revolutionary War general who settled in Middle Tennessee after the Revolution and served as President of the Council of the Territory of Tennessee before Tennessee attained statehood.


Overview
Rutherford County was settled by several groups of Virginia Gilliams. Thomas, William and Harrison Gilliam, the sons of James Gilliam and Martha Isbell of Charlotte County, VA were in Rutherford by 1805. This William is often referred to as William Gilliam of Maury.

Another group of Gilliams were those out of Buckingham County, VA. It appears from Rutherford deeds that Isham Gilliam, Sr. was in Rutherford by 1805. The Isham Gilliam, of the 1840 Census appears to be Isham Gilliam, the son Isham Gilliam, Sr. and Sarah Johns. This Isham married first in December 1832, Martha Spencer the daughter of Moses Spencer and Judith Ayres in according to the Moses Spencer Family Bible. Martha died by 1833. Isham then marries a Caroline of Virginia.

Caroline, must have been moved by the Mormon missionaries, John D. Lee and Lewis Stewart, who sojourned in Rutherford in the mid to late 1840s. Eventually Caroline heads West and joins Lee. Isham later travels West to retrieve his wife. Caroline returns to Rutherford. By 1850 Caroline is found living in Rutherford with James W. Gilliam and his wife, Mary, and son William. Apparently, Isham died in the intervening years. If James W. is a son of Isham, it does not appear he is a son of either Martha Spencer nor Caroline, due to his age. It is possible that Isham was married prior to his marriage to Martha. James’ birthplace is listed as Virginia. On 8 Jan 1857 Caroline marries secondly P. M. Dobrowski/Dobroske.

Yet another if the family of Richard Holland. Gilliam also of Buckingham County, VA. Richard Gilliam’s daughter Eliza Ann Gilliam, married a William Gilliam who had previously married in Rutherford Martha Woodson Molloy who also hailed from Buckingham. Richard Holland Gilliam’s Will was recorded in Buckingham County, VA and Rutherford County, TN.

The above William Gilliam settled Rutherford with siblings: Henry, Simeon, and Jesse.

A Jordan Gilliam appears in the 1830 Census. The age of this Jordan Gilliam precludes him from being either of the two Jordan Gilliams of Albemarle Parish, Surry County, VA.


Cemeteries
Cook's Cemetery, Milton, Rutherford County, TN
Isham Gilliam
“In Memory of Isham Gilliam Who . . .” [Illegible]






Census
1810
William Gillam
Jefferson, Rutherford
Free White Males Under 10: 2
Free White Males 26 to 44: 1
Free White Females Under 10: 2
Free White Females 26 to 44: 1
Number of Household Members Under 16: 4
Number of Household Members Over 25: 2
Number of Household Members: 6

1820
William Gilliam
Rutherford, Tennessee
Enumeration Date: August 7, 1820
Free White Males - 10 thru 15: 1
Free White Males - 16 thru 18: 1
Free White Males - 16 thru 25: 3
Number of Persons - Engaged in Manufactures: 4
Free White Persons - Under 16: 1
Total Free White Persons: 4
Total All Persons - White, Slaves, Colored, Other: 4

1830
Henry Gilliam
Rutherford, Tennessee
Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9: 2
Free White Persons - Males - 30 thru 39: 1
Free White Persons - Females - Under 5: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 20 thru 29: 1
Free White Persons - Under 20: 3
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 2
Total Free White Persons: 5
Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 5

Jessee Gilliam
Rutherford, Tennessee
Free White Persons - Males - 15 thru 19: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 50 thru 59: 1
Slaves - Females - 36 thru 54: 1
Free White Persons - Under 20: 1
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 1
Total Free White Persons: 3
Total Slaves: 1
Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 4

Jourdan Gilliam
Rutherford, Tennessee
Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 15 thru 19: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29: 1
Free White Persons - Females - Under 5: 2
Free White Persons - Females - 10 thru 14: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 40 thru 49: 1
Free White Persons - Under 20: 5
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 2
Total Free White Persons: 7
Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 7

Simmons Gilliam
Rutherford, Tennessee
Free White Persons - Males - 30 thru 39: 1
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 1
Total Free White Persons: 1
Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 1

Wm Gilliam
Rutherford, Tennessee
Free White Persons - Males - Under 5: 2
Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 15 thru 19: 2
Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29: 3
Free White Persons - Males - 30 thru 39: 2
Free White Persons - Females - 15 thru 19: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 20 thru 29: 1
Slaves - Males - 10 thru 23: 3
Slaves - Females - Under 10: 3
Slaves - Females - 10 thru 23: 1
Free White Persons - Under 20: 6
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 6
Total Free White Persons: 12
Total Slaves: 7
Total - All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 19

1840
Isham Gilliam
Rutherford, Tennessee
Free White Persons - Males - 30 thru 39: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 20 thru 29: 1
Slaves - Males - Under 10: 3
Slaves - Males - 10 thru 23: 2
Slaves - Males - 24 thru 35: 1
Slaves - Females - 10 thru 23: 1
Slaves - Females - 24 thru 35: 1
Total - All Persons (Free White, Free Colored, Slaves): 10
Persons Employed in Agriculture: 4
Persons Employed in Manufacture and Trade: 1
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 2
Total Free White Persons: 2
Total Slaves: 8
Total All Persons - Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 10

Jessie Gilliam
Rutherford, Tennessee
Free White Persons - Males - 30 thru 39: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 60 thru 69: 1
Slaves - Males - 10 thru 23: 1
Slaves - Females - 10 thru 23: 1
Total - All Persons (Free White, Free Colored, Slaves): 4
Persons Employed in Manufacture and Trade: 2
No. White Persons over 20 Who Cannot Read and Write: 1
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 1
Total Free White Persons: 2
Total Slaves: 2
Total All Persons - Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 4

Wm Gilliam
Rutherford, Tennessee
Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 14: 2
Free White Persons - Males - 15 thru 19: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 40 thru 49: 1
Free White Persons - Females - Under 5: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 20 thru 29: 1
Slaves - Males - 10 thru 23: 4
Slaves - Males - 24 thru 35: 3
Slaves - Females - Under 10: 1
Slaves - Females - 10 thru 23: 4
Slaves - Females - 24 thru 35: 1
Total - All Persons (Free White, Free Colored, Slaves): 21
Persons Employed in Agriculture: 4
Persons Employed in Manufacture and Trade: 4
Free White Persons - Under 20: 5
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 3
Total Free White Persons: 8
Total Slaves: 13
Total All Persons - Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 21

1850
John D Smith
Age: 46
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1804
Birth Place: Virginia
Gender: Male
Trimbels, Rutherford, Tennessee
Family Number: 124
John D Smith, age 46
Elizabeth Smith, age 40
George M Smith, age 22
Martha Smith, age 17
Elizabeth Smith, age 15
Benjamin Smith, age 14
America Smith, age 9
Lafayette Smith, age 6
Rebecca Gilliam, age 92
Thomas Smith, age 0

Jessee Gilliam
Age: 45
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1805
Birth Place: Virginia
McCrackins, Rutherford, Tennessee
Family Number: 52
Jessee Gilliam, age 45
Catharine Gilliam, age 25
James Gilliam, age 5
William Gilliam, age 4
John D Gilliam, age 1
Richard Gilliam, age 27

Henry Gilliam
Age: 55
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1795
Birth Place: Virginia
McCrackins, Rutherford, Tennessee
Family Number: 53
Henry Gilliam, age 55
Lucy Gilliam, age 49
Thomas Gilliam, age 26
Mary J Gilliam, age 23
Lucy L Gilliam, age 7
Hetty Stepherd, age 65
[Hetty Shepherd is the mother of Lucy, wife of Henry.]

Caroline Gilliam
Age: 37
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1813
Birth Place: Virginia
Gender: Female
Browns Mill, Rutherford, Tennessee
Family Number: 422
Caroline Gilliam, age 37
James W Gilliam, age 23
Mary Gilliam, age 24
William Gilliam, age 1



Deeds
8 Jul 1803
William Gilliam to Daniel Boatright
Indenture July 8, 1803. William Gilliam of Maury Co. Tenn.
Lot in Town of Jefferson
Wit: Joel Dyer, David Abbott
Registered April Session 1809 Rutherford County Court
Joseph Herndon, Clerk

Rutherford County, TN, Deed Record F, 636

13 Nov 1803
Robert Weakley and John P. Bedford to Samuel Henderson ____ acres. Indenture Nov. 13, 1803 between Robert Weakey & Thomas Bedford and William Gilliam. William Gilliam assigned his rights to Samuel Henderson, Aug, 7, 1805
This Indenture April, 1806 between Robert Weakley and John R„ Bedford, Administrator of Thomas Bedford, dec'd. and Samuel Henderson
Wit: Samuel M. Henderson Samuel C. McNeis
Registered April Session 1806 Hutherford County Court
Rutherford County, TN, Deed Record B, Number 220

28 Sep 1805
John Gilliam and Isham Gilliam to Edmund Johns 313 acres. Indenture 28 Sept, 1805 between John and Isham Gilliam, both of Buckingham County Va. and Edmund Johns of same County. John and Isham Gilliam purchased from Thomas Cox.
Begin S of Samuel Wilson's SW corner etc
Wit: John Johns, Judith Johns, Anne Johns
Appeared in open Court John & Judith Johns.
Registered Jan. Session 1806 Rutherford County Court
Rutherford County, TN, Deed Record B, Number 12___

17 Oct 1805
Isham Gilliam and John Gilliam to John Johns 313 acres. Indenture 17 Oct, 1805 between Isham and John Gilliam of Buckingham Co. Va. and John Johns of Rutherford Co. Tenn.
Being part of a tract of land purchased from Thomas Cox.
Begin at SW cor Samuel Wilson thence etc.
Wit: Edmond Johns Judith Johns
Registered Jan. Session 1806. Rutherford County Court
Rutherford County, TN, Deed Record B, Number ___

_6 Dec 1805
Conimissioners of Jefferson to Harrisson Gilliam
Indenture Dec. _6, 1805
Lots 123 & 162 Town of Jefferson
Wit: S. Bedford, Peter Legrand
Rutherford County, TN, Deed Record B, Number 102

31 Jan 1807
William Gilliam to Daniel Ferguson
Indenture Jan. 31, 1807
Lot 113 Town of Jefferson
Wit: John Spence, Stephen Bedford
Registered April Session 1807 Rutherford County Court
Rutherford County, TN, Deed Record E, Number ___,


Marriages
8 May 1823
Gilliam, William & Moll[o]y, Martha

27 May 1830
Gilliam, Thomas & Travis, Elizabeth

29 Sep 1831
Gilliam, James & Lawrence, Margaret C.

13 Oct 1831
Gilliam, John & Bone, Melissa

23 Jun 1843
Adams, John Q. & Gillem, Martha Ann

28 Jun 1843
Giliam, Richard & Adams, Susan

2 Nov 1843
Gilliam, Jesse & Wright, Catherine

2 Sep 1848
Gilliam, James W. & Bethshares, Mary E.

2 Oct 1850
Gilliam, Anderson & Causey, Catharine

1 Aug 1850
Mitchell, Robert & Gilliam, Mary J.

30 Mar 1879
Gillem, Julius & Smith, Julia


Religion
From John Doyle Lee: Zealot, Pioneer-builder, Scapegoat
He moved among the homes of his friends, never lacking for invitations; he debated with local ministers and held meetings. In Overton County he made his headquarters at the home of a wealthy man names Armstrong, whose wife Nancy was converted and baptized. In Rutherford County he stayed at the home of Isham Gilliam, where again he . . .
John Doyle Lee: Zealot, Pioneer-builder, Scapegoat, Juanita Brooks, A. H. Clark Co., 1962, page 49.

Miss Mary Sanders put a new lining in my stockin Mrs. Gilliam (Caroline) made me a present of a pair of flannel drawers, for which I felt thankful, I very much needed them, for my old ones were considerably worn . . . Mrs. C. Gilliam mended my coat
John Doyle Lee: Zealot, Pioneer-builder, Scapegoat, Juanita Brooks, A. H. Clark Co., 1962, page 50

On June 6 Levi Stewart arrived from Tennessee, bringing with him Caroline Gilliam and Drusilla Holt. He had been sent in February with the order that he should persuade Mrs. Gilliam to join the saints. Though she had pretended that she was coming only to visit Nancy . . .
John Doyle Lee: Zealot, Pioneer-builder, Scapegoat, Juanita Brooks, A. H. Clark Co., 1962, page 118

From the Journal of John D. Lee
. . . Heard tht Bro. L Steward had arrived. Bought with him Sister Gilliam & and Drusilla Holt. But every sweet has its bitter.”
Journal of John D. Lee, page 174

1847
July 1 -- About six P.M. Bro. John H. Redd and Isham Gilliam both Rutherford Co. Tenn. Men arrived in camp.
[A note at the bottom of the page says: "John H. Redd an old sea captain formerly from South Carolina had protected Lee when the Mormon missionaries in Rutherford Co. Tenn. had been attacked by a mob. He later became converted and the prefix 'Bro.' indicates he was a Mormon at this time."]
[In margin: Isham Gilliam comes for sister Caroline]

Journal of John D. Lee, page 184

July 4 -- Left Bro. John H. Redd considerably difficulted in his mind with reference to moving west. After meeting, Bro. Redd, I. Gilliam and Caroline and several others dined with J. D. Lee.
[A note at the bottom of the page reads: "John H. Redd later emigrated and founded the Redd family of southeastern Utah."]

July 5 -- Clear, wind S.W. About 8 Friend Gilliam, sister Caroline (Gilliam's wife) and J. H. Redd started for Tennessee, their Native land.
[In margin: Sister Caroline decides to return]
Journal of John D. Lee, page 185

[Introduced to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, John Doyle Lee and his wife moved to Far West, Missouri, in June 1838 and began the association which influenced the rest of his life. Lee and his wife were baptized on 17 June 1838 after meeting Joseph Smith for the first time. The experience of baptism was powerful enough to cause him to dedicate his life to the Mormon Church.

Lee was a friend of Joseph Smith, Jr., founder of the LDS Church. He was the adopted son of Brigham Young under the early church doctrine the Law of Adoption.

Election day, 6 August 1838, provided Lee an opportunity to defend the rights of Mormon voters when Missourians who objected to Mormons voting started a riot. When one member of the secret order made the sign of distress, eight others, including Lee, waded in with clubs and brought calm to the street. Organized marauders on both sides set loose looting and burning; Lee later admitted to looting. Governor Lilburn Boggs sent in the state militia with his "Extermination Order" to protect the public good. The Mormons, including Lee, left Missouri for Nauvoo, Illinois.

In 1839, Lee served a Mormon mission with his boyhood friend, Levi/Lewis Stewart. Together they preached in Illinois, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee. During this period Lee converted and baptized numerous people.

Lee enjoyed success as a preacher, organizer, and healer. He returned to Nauvoo in August 1843 and resumed his duties as a guard at the home of Joseph Smith—a duty he regarded as a privilege. He felt that, "save Jesus Christ," no greater man than the Mormon Prophet had ever lived. When spring came, Lee was called on another mission and went to eastern Kentucky, where he was serving in June 1844 when Joseph and Hyrum Smith were murdered. He returned in August to face a new and threatening situation from neighbors who did not want Mormons in Illinois.

Lee was an official scribe for the Council of 50, a group of men who, in the days of Joseph Smith, Jr. and Brigham Young, worked together to provide guidance in practical matters to the church, specifically concerning the move westward out of the United States of America to the Rocky Mountains. Brigham Young, the de facto leader of the Mormons, had started preparations for a move to the West where the Mormons could practice their religion in peace.

After Smith's murder, Lee joined the bulk of the LDS Church's members in what is now Utah and worked towards establishing several new communities. A successful and resourceful farmer and rancher, in 1856, Lee became a US Indian Agent in the Iron County area, assigned to help Native Americans establish farms. In 1858 Lee served a term as a member of the Utah Territorial Legislature.

In September 1857, the Baker-Fancher party, an emigrant group from Arkansas, camped at Mountain Meadows, a staging area in southern Utah used to prepare for the long crossing of the Mohave desert by groups traveling to California. They were attacked by a combined group of Native Americans and Mormon militiamen dressed as Native Americans. On the third day of the siege, Lee approached the Baker-Fancher encirclement under cover of a white flag and convinced the emigrants to surrender their weapons and property to the Mormons in return for safe conduct to nearby Cedar City, whereupon approximately 120 of the Baker-Fancher, party were killed by Mormon militia, leaving only about 17 small children as survivors.

William Ashworth notes in his autobiography that after the massacre, that the "leaders among the white men had bound themselves under the most binding oaths to never reveal their part in it." Lee told Brigham Young that the Indians had been solely responsible, that "no white men were mixed up in it."

Lee later maintained that he had acted under orders from his militia leaders, under protest. Lee remained active in Mormonism and local government for several years.

In 1874, Lee was arrested and tried for leading the massacre. The first trial ended in a hung jury, but he was tried again in 1877 and sentenced to death. Lee never denied his own complicity, but claimed he hadn't personally killed anyone. He said he had been a vocally reluctant participant and later a scapegoat meant to draw attention away from other Mormon leaders who were also involved.

Lee further maintained that LDS President Brigham Young had no knowledge of the event until after it happened. However, in the Life and Confessions of John D. Lee he wrote, "I have always believed, since that day, that General George A. Smith was then visiting southern Utah to prepare the people for the work of exterminating Captain Fancher's train of emigrants, and I now believe that he was sent for that purpose by the direct command of Brigham Young."

On March 23, 1877, Lee was executed by firing squad at Mountain Meadows on the site of the 1857 massacre. His last words included a reference to Young: "I do not believe everything that is now being taught and practiced by Brigham Young. I do not care who hears it. It is my last word... I have been sacrificed in a cowardly, dastardly manner."]



Wills
June 1808
Will of Harrison GILLIAM

In the name of God, Amen. I, Harrison GILLIAM, of Rutherford County and State of Tennessee, being weak in body, but in sound mind, do make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following, to wit:
First my desire is that my just debts should be paid out of my estate, and in the 2nd place my desire is that my Negro man, Anthony, should be free after my decease, provided my estate should be sufficient to pay my just debts, and thirdly, my desire is that as the balance of my estate that might remain should be equally divided between all my brother Thomas GILLIAM’s children and lastly, I hereby constitute and appoint William A. Sublett and William Thweatt to execute this my last will and testament. In witness hereof, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this tenth day of June 1808.

Sig: Harrison GILLIAM.

Wit: Rhoda Benge, Polly Thweatt, Elizabeth Thweatt, Mary Tarpley
State of Tennessee, Rutherford County Court, July Term 1808
The above will being contested, was found by a verdict of a jury at the above term to be the last will & testament of the said Harrison GILLIAM, deceased, & as such is ordered to be admitted to record.
Joseph Herndon, Clk


7 Feb 1833
Will of Richard GILLIAM

In the name of God Amen, I Richard GILLIAM of Buckingham Co, in State of Virginia being in sound mind (etc).

It is my will/desire that my beloved wife Elizabeth GILLIAM should have the benefit of my houses, plantation land during her widowhood . . . and the benefit of the following negroes, viz: Harry and his wife Hannah, Mat, Danel? (yellow) ____ Aggy, Nancy and a girl Rhoda, also 2 boys Isaac and Powell with their increase. It is my will that she should take as much of my stock, plantation tools household and kitchen furniture as may be necessary for her support during her widowhood together with a sufficiency of provision for the support of the plantation one year.

At her death or marriage it is my will and desire that all of the above named negroes with their increase together with my lands and all of the stock, household and kitchen furniture tools and crops that may be on hand at the time, be sold by my executors and the proceeds arising therefrom equally divided among my children or their heirs or representatives as herein after directed. It is my will/desire at my death that the remaining part of my stock crop plantation tools household and kitchen furniture that may be on hand after my aforesaid wife Elizabeth GILLIAM shall have taken so much thereof as be thought necessary for her support and use, be sold and the proceeds thereof equally divided among my children their heirs or representatives as herein after directed.

It is my will/desire that my tract of land lying on the head of Halfway Creek in Buckingham Co be sold by my executors whenever they may think best and the proceeds thereof equally divided among my children etc.

I give to my son Edmund G. GILLIAM the following negroes viz: Mike, Rachel, Harrison and Stephen (son of Aggy) and to his heirs forever also 2 beds and furniture which property I have valued to him at $917.

I give to my son Glover D. GILLIAM the following negroes viz: Stephen (son) of ____ and James which together with stock furniture and money heretofore furnished him I have valued to him at $1101 to him and his heirs forever.

I give to my daughter Lucy D. Gary the following negroes viz: Sam ______ Charles and Rozanna which together with stock and furniture heretofore furnished her, I have valued to her at $960 to her and her heirs forever.

I give to my sons Edmund J. GILLIAM and Richard H. GILLIAM in trust for the benefit of my daughter Sally W. Neighbors and heirs of her body the following negroes to wit: Celia, Sophia, Mahala and Joe which together with stock/furniture heretofore furnished her, I have valued to her at $950.
It is my will and desire that the above negroes together with their increase shall be held for the benefit of my said daughter Sally and the heirs of her body in trust by said son Edmund J. GILLIAM and Richard H. GILLIAM and at her death that they should go to her children and if her children should not arrive at full age or die without issue then it is my will that the property hereby given together with its increase and all the other property she may receive on an equal division of my estate shall should revert back to my children equally division among them.

I give to my son Richard H. GILLIAM the following slaves viz: Jack, Judy, Delaware and Martha also 2 beds and furniture which I have valued to him at $872 to him and his heirs forever.

I give to my son Edmund J. GILLIAM and Richard H. GILLIAM in trust for the benefit of my daughter Eiiza G. GILLIAM and the heirs of her body, the following negroes viz: Monroe, Louisa and Lucy. Also 2 beds and furniture which I have valued to her at $932.

It is my will/desire that the above negroes together with their increase should be held for the benefit of my said daughter Eliza and the heirs of her body in trust by my said sons E. J. GILLIAM and R. H. GILLIAM and at her death that they should go to her children and if her children should not arrive at full age or die without issue then it is my will that the property herby given with its increase together with all the other property she may receive on an equal division of my estate shall revert back to my other children equal division among them.

It being my will/desire that all my children should share equally in the benefit of my estate the property given off to them by this my last will and testament I have valued to them at the time of receiving it and set it down to them arriving to that valuation and it is my will/desire that the several _____ thus set down as given to them above should be taken into consideration in the final division of my estate among m children free of interest so that all shall be made equal in such division and receive the same amount of my estate.
It is also my will/desire that my daughter Eliza G. GILLIAM should _____ with her mother during her life if she my daughter Eliza should remain single so long, free of charge.

I do hereby appoint my sons Edmund J. GILLIAM and Richard H. GILLIAM my executors to this my last will/testament.
In witness whereof I have hereunto signed my name this the 9th day of Feb, 1833.

Sig: Richard GILLIAM

Wit: William GILLIAM, John H. Rowton, James Anderson

At a Court held for Buckingham Co, the 9th day of Sept 1839, this will was proved in open court by oaths of William GILLIAM and John H. Rowton, 2 of the subscribing witnesses and ordered to be recorded and another court held for the said county on Monday the 9th Dec following on the motion of Edward J. GILLIAM (notice Edward, not Edmund) one of the executors named in said will who took the oath and together with Thomas Sanders and Thomas Gary his securities entered into and acknowledged as bound in the penalty of $40,000 dollars conditioned as the law directs certificate is granted him for obtaining a probate of said will in due form. Rolfe Eldridge C. B. C. A Copy, test Rolfe Eldridge C. B. C.

State of Virginia, Buckingham Co to wit: I, Ralph Eldridge Clerk of the County Court of Buckingham ado hereby certify that the foregoing is a true transcript from the records of the said court. In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and annexed the seal of the said court this 22 May in the year 1842. signed Rolfe Eldridge

Virginia Buckingham Co to wit: I Charles Yancey presiding Justice of the Peace in/for Buckingham Co, Va. do certify that Rolfe Eldridge who hath given the proceeding certificate is clerk of said court and that his said attestation is in due form. Given under my hand this 2nd day of June 1842. Charles Yancy, P. J. P.

STATE OF TENNESSEE, Rutherford Co Court, July term 1842. The foregoing copy and certificate thereon of the last will and testament of Richard GILLIAM deceased was proven in open court at the above mentioned term and was ordered to be recorded. Robert S. Morris, Clerk of Rutherford County Court.
Received July 19, 1842

John S Cooke sold his interest in the land of his father, Stephen Cooke, Esq., to brother Abraham Cooke in 1811. He is next found in 1822 in Bedford Co., TN in a deed to a relative, George Hooper:

Deed dated 14 Oct 1822, Registered 4 Jul 1823
John Cooke & Charlotte, his wife & Abraham B. Routon & Ann, h/w TO George Hooper 130 acres of land in Bedford County, TENN.

Witnesses: Francis Mosley, S.S. Mosley, Richard GILLIAM
Acknowledged in Buckingham Co, VA by Cooke & Routon.
Rutherford County, TN, Record Book 12, Page 195-198

7 Apr 1854
Last Will and Testament of Frances M. Molloy

I Fanny M. Molloy of the County of Rutherford and State of Tennessee do make, publish and declare this to be my last Will and Testament, hereby revoking all former Wills by me made: that is say: . . .

Seventh I give and bequeath to my Grandsons Sanford and William GILLIAM the only surviving children of my daughter Martha GILLIAM deceased one other fifth part of my said estate, to them and their heirs forever . . .

Likewise I make, constitute and appoint my said sons John and David B. Molloy to be executors of this my Last Will and Testament.
In witness whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed my seal the 7th day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifth four.

Sig: Fanny M. Molloy

The above written instrument was subscribed by the said Fanny M. Molloy in our presence and acknowledged by her to each of us’ and she at the same time published and declared the above instrument so subscribed to be her last will and testament and we at the testatrix’s request and in her presence have signed our names as witnesses hereto:

Wit: C. M. Brooks, Saml Campbell, Jurat

State of Tennessee, Rutherford County Court October Term 1855.

The execution in open court at the above mentioned term of the foregoing last will and testament of Fanny M. Molloy deceased was duly proven by the oaths of C. M. Brooks and Saml Campbell subscribing witnesses thereto and was ordered to be recorded,
John Woods, CC.

[Frances Martin Gannaway, daughter of John Gannaway and Martha Woodson, his wife, married GILLIAM Molloy, who appears to be the son of David Molloy and Rhoda GILLIAM, his wife. Frances' daughter, Martha Woodson Molloy married William GILLIAM. Her grandsons, Sanford and William, the children of William, are mentioned in her Will.]


Sources